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A spatula used to smooth plaster between two sheets of villaboard

Overview

Knowing how to install villaboard is a handy skill for renovating a bathroom or laundry. We'll teach you how to fill in the gap between two boards to give your wall a consistent, smooth finish. We also cover how to reinforce it with paper tape. And show how to use paint scrapers to do the job properly.

Steps

1Apply a first coat of compound to stop up the villaboard joint

Mix up some base coat compound to a toothpaste consistency. Then apply it to the joint between two boards with your 75mm paint scraper. Make sure you work quickly, as the compound has a short drying time. While the compound is still wet, place a strip of paper tape over the joint and flatten it down with your scraper. Then apply a little bit more compound over the top of the tape and smooth it out with the wall. 
A gap between two sheets of villaboard being filled with plaster

2Apply a second coat of compound to finish of the villaboard joint

Now take your 100mm trowel and apply a fresh batch of compound thinly across the joint. Spread it slightly wider than the joint so it blends in smoothly with the surface of the wall. Once it has dried, the joint is ready to have a waterproof membrane or tiles applied over the top. If you plan to paint the surface, apply a third, slightly wider coat of compound first. To finish off, fill in any nail holes with a small amount of compound.

A spatula used to smooth plaster between two sheets of villaboard

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.