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A person marking a tile wall using a set square

Overview

Wall cabinets in a bathroom are a handy place for storage. We’ll teach you how to mount one on your wall properly. You'll also learn how to find a wall stud and a neat way to drill through tiles.

Steps

1Mark out the position of the bathroom cabinet on the wall

Start by taking the shelves and doors off the cabinet, then choose where you want to mount it on the wall. In our case, we've chosen a spot that lines up with the centre point of our vanity and the grout lines of our tiles. Once you've chosen your position, use a spirit level to mark the outline of the cabinet on the wall.
A person marking a tile wall using a set square

2Mark out the position of the wall stud on the bathroom cabinet

To attach the cabinet firmly to the wall, you need to screw into the timber framework of the house. Use your stud finder to work out where your wall studs are within the outline of the cabinet. Then use a tape measure to mark up that position onto the back panel of your cabinet.
A person using a stud finder on a tiled wall

3Install the bathroom cabinet on the wall

Pre-drill two pilot holes in the cabinet in line with your stud mark ups. Then get someone to hold the cabinet in position while you drive your screws through the pilot holes into the stud. If you are mounting on a tile wall, you'll need to drill through the tiles first. Get someone to hold the cabinet while you lightly mark your holes on the wall with a hammer drill. Then take the cabinet away and drill through the tiles. Finish by screwing the cabinet into the wall stud and installing the shelves and doors.
One person driving a screw through a cabinet while another person holds it against a tiled wall
Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.