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A floating timber vanity with a curved white basin on top and towels below the drawers

Overview

A vanity is one of the most important features in any bathroom. Not just for its practical use but it can also completely change the look and feel of your space. This timber vanity is easy to make yourself and will add warmth, character and style.

Steps

1Measure and mark the timber

All of the timber panels are 600mm wide, we need to cut all of them to 500mm. Clamp the wood to the workbench and mark it at 500mm. Use the 90-degree square to run a line down the length of the timber.

A person clamping a panel of timber to a work bench

2Cut the timber

With the wood clamped, use the circular saw to cut it to the right width. Don't rush, you want a nice smooth finish. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to cut all of the timber to the right width.

A person cutting a timber panel using a circular saw and straight edge

3Cut a mitre edge on the top piece of timber

Choose the best looking piece of long timber and mark it. Wrap painters or masking tape around one end – this will stop the wood from splintering. Mark a straight line along the tape. Set the circular saw to a 45-degree angle and cut the timber.

A person cutting a timber panel on a 45 degree angle using a circular saw

4Measure and mark the next cut

From the mitre cut, measure and mark 1500mm. Use the 90-degree T-square to run a straight line across the timber.

A person cutting a timber panel using a drop saw

5Cut the timber

Wrap masking tape over where you're going to cut. Re-mark 1500mm on the tape. Use the circular saw to cut a 45-degree angle. Repeat the previous steps to cut the other long piece, which will be the bottom of the vanity.

Person putting masking tape on a timber panel

6Measure and mark the side panel

From the mitred edge, measure and mark 430mm. Wrap masking tape around the timber. Then, re-mark the 430mm mark on the tape.

A person marking a measurement onto a timber panel using a measuring tape

7Cut the side panel to size

With the wood clamped to the workbench, cut the timber at a 45-degree angle. Repeat the previous steps to mitre cut the other side panel to size.

Timber cut on a 45 degree angle

8Sand the interior facing panel

Use 120 grit sandpaper to sand the interior facing panel pieces of the vanity before putting it together. Don't sand the edges because you won't get a nice, neat finish on your mitre joins.

A person sanding a timber panel using an orbital sander

9Assemble the outer frame

Stand a top or bottom panel and a side panel on their edge. Clamp each end to help balance the pieces while you're working. Make sure the mitre joints are flush. Liberally apply PVA glue to both mitred sides and join them together. Use tape to hold the panels in place. Then, use the nail gun to fix the two pieces together. To make the vanity look good, fix the majority of nails along the side panel. Add three fixing nails to the top to keep it secure. Repeat this to fix the two other outer panels.

A person placing a clamp next to an L-shaped timber panel

10Fix the outer frame together

Take the two L-shaped panel and join them together. Apply glue to the mitre joints and tape the sides to hold the frame. Use the nail gun to fix the panels. Wipe away any excess glue.

A person attaching an end piece to a timber box using a nail gun

11Assemble the drawers

Follow the instructions on the flat pack drawers to assemble them. Glue the corners together to give them extra strength.

A person applying glue into the holes in a drawer panel

12Measure and mark for the drawers

Measure the width of the drawers, including the sliders. Transfer these measurements to the left- and right-hand side on the bottom panel of the outer frame.

A person marking a measurement onto a timber panel using a measuring tape

13Measure the divider

Measure the height and length for the vanity divider. When measuring the length, take into account the back panel that will be attached to the vanity. Transfer these measurements to the timber. 

A person marking a measurement onto a timber panel using a set square

14Cut the dividers

Clamp the timber to the workbench. Use the circular saw to cut the divider. Repeat this step for the other divider. Sand the edges of the timber with 180 grit sandpaper.

A person cutting a timber panel using a drop saw

15Fix the divider

Apply a bead of glue where the divider will be attached. Put the divider in place. Turn the vanity over so that the bottom panel is facing upwards. Use the nail gun to secure the dividers. Turn the vanity back over and use the nail gun to fix the divider. Don't use too many nails on the top of the vanity because you don't want to spoil the look. 

A person applying glue in a line across a timber panel

16Secure the divider with brackets

To make sure the divider is firmly fixed, attach brackets to them on the inside edge of the drawer opening and underside of the top. Space the brackets out evenly. Mark where the screw holes should be and pre-drill using a 3mm drill bit. Screw the brackets into place.

A person attaching a corner bracket onto a shelf inside a timber vanity unit

17Attach the drawer sliders

Follow the instructions on the package to install the drawer sliders. Turn the vanity on its side. Place the sliders where you want them to be and mark where you need to drill. Pre-drill the holes and screw the sliders into place with the 16mm screws.

A person marking hole positions for a metal drawer runner

18Measure and mark for the back panel

Take the height and length measurements from the back of the vanity. Transfer these measurements onto a piece of timber.

A person marking a measurement onto a timber panel using a measuring tape

19Cut the back panel

Clamp the timber to the workbench. Use the circular saw to cut the back panel to size. Then, sand it with 180 grit sandpaper to make the edges smooth.

A person cutting a timber panel using a drop saw

20Attach the back panel

Draw a line across the top and bottom of the vanity where the panel will be fixed. This will make sure the nails are in a straight line. Apply glue to the edges of the back panel. Put the panel in place. Use the nail gun to fix the back panel in place at the top, bottom and sides of the vanity. Wipe away any excess glue. Leave to dry.

A person fitting a back panel into the sides and top of a timber vanity unit

21Measure and mark for the front of the drawers

Measure from the outer side of the end panel to the outside of the upright drawer divider. Leave enough room for the drawer to work well, even if it gets damp. Transfer these measurements onto the timber. Make sure the grain runs along the width of the drawer.

A person using a metal ruler to measure between a drawer and a timber panel

22Cut out the front of the drawers

Clamp the timber to the workbench. Use the circular saw to cut out the two fronts for the drawers. Use 180 grit sandpaper to make the edges smooth.

A person marking a piece of timber using a set square and pencil

23Attach the front of the drawers

Clamp the timber front to the drawer, making sure it's flush with the edge and divider. Use a 5mm drill bit to pre-drill four holes on the drawer, two on each side. Use the 16mm screws to fix the timber to the drawer. Repeat this to attach the other front to the drawer.

A person clamping a piece of timber to the front of a drawer

24Putty up any holes or gaps

Use a suitable wood putty to fill any holes or gaps. Let the putty dry. Sand the entire vanity with 180 grit sandpaper to get a smooth surface.

A person filling holes in a timber panel using wood putty

25Varnish the vanity

We're applying a clear varnish to seal the timber and show off its natural grain. Stir the varnish thoroughly before applying. Use a good quality brush for a perfect finish. Leave the varnish to dry then sand with 240 grit sandpaper. Wipe away any sawdust. Apply three coats of varnish, lightly sanding between coats.

A person applying clear sealer to a timber vanity unit

26Pre-drill the fixing holes

Determine where you want the vanity to go in the bathroom. Use the 5mm drill bit to pre-drill holes in the back of the vanity and into the tiles where the vanity will be fixed to the wall. Also use a spade bit to drill any holes you might need for plumbing and electrical cords.

A tiled bathroom wall with holes drilled and pipes capped off

27Fix the vanity to the wall

You'll need someone to help you with this step. Lift the vanity into place. Use timber supports to hold the vanity while it is being fixed into place. Check that the vanity is level. Screw through the top middle and bottom of the vanity with the 100mm bugle screws to fix it to the wall. And there you have it a great looking vanity that's added a touch of style to your bathroom.

A person checking a timber vanity alignment with a spirit level

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.