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Bunnings team member placing a large mirror against a white tile wall in a bathroom

Overview

We’ll teach you how to mount a mirror on your bathroom wall. You’ll learn how to position it to tie in with the rest of the room and what materials to use to make sure it stays there.

Steps

1Prepare the back of the bathroom mirror

Before you begin, remove any dirt and grime from the wall with some cleaning fluid and a soft cloth. Then stick some strips of double-sided tape on the back of the mirror. Add a few beads of silicone between the tape for added strength.
DIY Step Image - How to install a bathroom mirror . Blob storage upload.

2Mark out the position for the bathroom mirror on the wall

Most people like to position the mirror above the vanity. Once you've chosen your position, use your pencil and level to mark out where you want the side and bottom edges of the mirror to be. In this case, we've lined up the outside edge of the mirror with the side of our vanity unit. We then set the mirror height so that it sits squarely in the middle of the tiles.

DIY Step Image - How to install a bathroom mirror . Blob storage upload.

3Install the bathroom mirror on the wall

Stack some packing blocks up, level with the bottom edge you marked on the wall. To give the blocks some stability, you can stick them to the wall with masking tape.

Then remove the backing from the double-sided tape on the mirror. Rest the base of the mirror on the packing blocks and pivot it into position on the wall. Push gently against the glass, starting in the centre and working out towards the edges. This will spread the silicone and improve the bond.

Finish by sticking some tape in the corners, and give the silicone 24 hours to set properly.


DIY Step Image - How to install a bathroom mirror . Blob storage upload.

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.