Bunnings
Project listShopping cart

Sign in to your account

Project list

Sign in to your account

An angle grinder being used to cut vertical lines into a brick wall

Overview

If you are planning to install a new window, door or access panel into a brick wall, you'll need to cut a new opening in the bricks. We can show you how to cut into brick using an angle grinder. You'll also learn the best tools to use, how to measure and mark up, and the best way to knock the bricks out safely.

Steps

1Before you start cutting into the brick wall, install a lintel

Before cutting an opening in a brick wall, you need to install a steel lintel above where you want the hole. This will ensure that the wall remains properly supported and won't collapse under its own weight. Once the lintel is installed, mark out your vertical cutting lines with a spirit level.
A lintel being installed into a brick wall before cutting into it

2Cut the opening in the wall

Use an angle grinder to cut the straight vertical lines into the wall. A lot of brick dust will be kicked up, so wear a dust mask, safety glasses and earmuffs. Remember, you get a much cleaner cut if you don't push too hard on the angle grinder and just let the tool do the work.
An angle grinder being used to cut vertical lines into a brick wall

3Loosen the mortar between the bricks

Use a hammer drill and masonry bit to drill holes in the mortar between the bricks you want to remove. Mortar is a lot softer than brick so you can do this quite quickly. It makes it easier to knock the bricks out of the wall, rather than having to use excessive force.
A hammer drill being used to loosen mortar between bricks

4Knock the bricks out of the wall

Use the mash hammer and brick bolster to remove the bricks from the opening. Hit carefully near the edges of the opening to preserve the clean edges of the bricks. You should also be careful when removing the top bricks so that you don't disturb the lintel.
A mash hammer being used to knock bricks out of an opening in the wall

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.