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A honeycomb wall shelf array mounted on a white wall with a pot plant below it

Overview

These honeycomb floating wall shelves are a modern and stylish way to make a feature of any wall in your house. They're easy to make and they'll give a somewhere to show off your favourite things.

Steps

1Cut the 30-degree mitres

The angle for each cut on the hexagon frame is 30 degrees. Set the drop saw at 30 degrees and make a mitre cut on one end of the length of oak. Then measure, mark and cut six pieces at 250mm, measuring long end to long end. Mitre both ends. These ends should be mirror images.

A circular saw used to cut a 30 degree corner into a panel of wood

2Build the honeycomb

Once your six pieces of timber are cut you can join them together. Placing one piece of timber on the workbench, apply a bead of wood glue to the end of another piece. Place this piece next to the first piece and clamp them together, making sure the angles are flush. Nail the timber in place. For each side, pin the top and bottom at opposing angles to help ensure a better join. Nail the centre to finish. Repeat this to join all six pieces of timber, making sure all edges are flush.

A hexagonal shelf frame being nailed together with a nail gun

3Putty the shelf

Use wood putty to fill any holes or gaps in the shelf. Let it dry.

Gaps in a hexagonal shelf being filled with putty

4Sand the shelf

Once the putty is dry use the orbital sander and the 240 grit sandpaper to sand the shelf so that the putty is flat and the edges are smooth.

A hexagon shelf being sanded down

5Stain the shelf

You can stain, varnish or paint the wall shelves to suit your décor. We applied a clear varnish to highlight the natural colour and grain.  Apply as many coats as necessary, lightly sanding between coats.

Glue being brushed onto the side of a hexagonal shelf ready for gluing to another hexagon

6Fix the shelf to the wall

To eliminate any visible wall fixings, we used a threaded rod to fix the shelves to the wall.  Measure, mark and cut the threaded rod to 100mm, use as many as you think necessary. Use a 6mm drill bit to drill 60mm into a stud in the wall. Do the same on the back of the shelf to a depth of 40mm. Hammer the threaded rod into the back of the shelf. Fit the rod into the matching holes on the wall. Repeat the steps above to make as many shelves as you like. You can also add internal shelves within the shelves.

A length of dowel being hammered into a hexagonal shelf frame

7Time to decorate!

Now your shelves are on the wall, you can fill them with whatever you like. It will look great and you can be proud of the fact you made it yourself.
A honeycomb wall shelf array mounted on a white wall with a pot plant below it

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.