Bunnings
Icon - Website - Mobile - Add to project list.svgIcon - Website - Mobile - Cart.svg

Sign in to your account

Project list

Sign in to your account

A 9V battery being pulled out of a smoke alarm

Overview

Working smoke alarms reduce the risk of fire in your home and help protect the lives of the whole household. Make sure your smoke alarms are working properly by testing each one and replacing their batteries at least once a year. This video shows you how quickly and easily you can change a battery by yourself.

Tools and materials

Tools

Materials

Steps

1Remove the smoke alarm from its bracket

Battery-powered smoke alarms are usually secured to the ceiling using a basic click-in-to-place bracket. Climb up the ladder and remove the alarm from the bracket. Every alarm model has a different way of doing this, but normally you either turn the alarm or slide it out to release it.
A smoke alarm being removed from its bracket in the ceiling

2Replace the old battery with a new one

It's safer to come down the ladder before doing this step. Disconnect the old battery and replace it with a new one. Once the new one is in place, climb back up the ladder and fix the alarm back into its bracket. While you're up there, press the alarm's test button to make sure it's working.
A 9V battery being pulled out of a smoke alarm

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.