Bunnings
Project listShopping cart

Sign in to your account

Project list

Sign in to your account

Modern ceiling fan with dark wooden blades.
Ceiling fans are a great way to stay comfortable when the temperature rises. When choosing the best ceiling fan for your space, there are a few things you might want to consider.

What size ceiling fan

It might sound obvious but the basic rule is the larger the room, the bigger the fan required. For a small room (up to 20 square metres) fans with blades up to 122cm are ideal. For a bigger room, you'll probably want to look for a fan with blades that are 130cm or more.

Take control

Generally, there are two options when it comes to controlling your fan. Either a wall switch with a dial to vary the speed, or a remote control if access to the roof and wiring is an issue.

Three or four blade ceiling fans

Most fans have either three or four blades and are made of either plywood, metal or plastic. The number of blades has no effect on their ability to cool a room but timber and plastic blades do tend to be a little quieter than metal. 

Finish and colour

Another factor worth considering is how your fan is going to look within a room, as they can become a dominant feature. This is not too much of an issue if it's going to be installed in an outdoor area, but for indoor fans it's worth thinking about how it will complement your colour scheme and décor.

AC or DC ceiling fan

Ceiling fans generally use either AC (alternating current) or DC (direct current) motors. DC models are becoming more and more popular because they are more efficient to run and use less energy than AC models. They also tend to offer a greater level of control, with up to seven speed settings available.

Get your fan

Check out the wide range of ceiling fans available at your local Bunnings.

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.