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Overview

We'll teach you how to install a shower screen yourself. Starting with how to put the screen panels in place and join them together properly. We will also show you how to make the screen level and give it a waterproof seal.

Steps

1Fix the metal channels for the shower screen to the wall

Draw up where the metal channels for the shower screen will be installed using your spirit level. Start your lines from the floor, making sure that the screen sits inside the lip of the shower base. Then place the steel channels on the lines and screw them into place. In this case we are screwing into a timber frame, but if you're screwing into tiles or plasterboard reinforce the screws with nylon wall plugs.

2Install the first panel of the shower screen

Slide the first panel into the channel on the wall and level it up. Then mark a vertical line where the panel meets the channel. Now prop the panel in place and, from inside the shower, drill three to four holes through the channel into the frame of the panel. Drill one hole near the top, another near the bottom and one or two evenly spaced in the middle. Once that is done, pop rivet the panel into place.

3Install the second panel of the shower screen

Now you're ready to slide the second panel into place and join it up with the first one. Make sure the panel is level in the wall channel and fix it in place as before. Once that is done, screw your handle into the pre-drilled holes in the door.

4Seal the shower screen with silicone

Put masking tape down the inside of the shower, close to where the metal channels sit on the wall. Then run a thin bead of silicone down the join between the wall and the metal channel. To give the silicone a neat finish, check out our video How to finish silicone. Once the silicone's done, peel off the tape, give the silicone time to cure and your shower is ready.

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.