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A Bunnings team member shovelling potting mix into a garden bed

Overview

Fruit trees not only look great, they can be a productive part of your garden. We’ll take you through the steps to plant a fruit tree and have it thriving in no time. Remember to select a site that gets plenty of sun, is well drained and has good quality soil for best results. 

Steps

1Dig your hole

Citrus trees grow best in areas with plenty of sunlight. When digging your hole for the tree, make sure it is twice the size of the root base. It's also good idea to give your tree some room to grow, so leave a clear area around the base. 
A Bunnings team member shovelling potting mix into a garden bed

2Plant the tree

Remove the tree from the pot by giving it a little tap on the edge. Tease out the roots of the tree and then place the tree in the middle of the hole. Backfill the hole with your existing soil so it just covers the potting mix. Then compact your soil so there aren't any air pockets within the hole. 

A Bunnings team member positioning a fruit tree into a hold dug in a garden bed

3Apply seaweed solution and mulch

Following the instructions on the pack, add seaweed extract to your watering can and drizzle on the plant. This will reduce transplant shock and help the roots to establish faster. Then spread 5–10cm of mulch around the base of the tree. This will help the soil to retain water and insulate the tree in winter.

A fruit tree planted in a backyard garden bed

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.