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Four rows of planters mounted into a blue painted brick wall

Overview

Growing a vertical garden can brighten up and refresh a dull fence or wall. It’s a great way to maximise smaller spaces and create a lush, green garden just about anywhere. Some of the best plants for vertical gardens are shade plants, succulents, and edible plants. They’re really easy to grow and we’ll show you how.

Steps

1Shade plants

Shade plants are perfect for vertical gardens and areas where most other plants won't grow. There are plenty of flowering and non-flowering varieties, including heuchera, liriope, lamium, Boston fern, vinca, viola, and ajuga.

They don't need much sun and will brighten up any dark spots in your backyard. However, they do need plenty of nutrients, so use a good potting mix with some compost and fertiliser to create the right soil conditions.

A plant being transferred from a pot into a vertical garden planter

2Succulents

Succulents are extremely hardy and come in all shapes, sizes and colours, including echeveria, kalanchoe, crassula, portulaca, aloe, and string of pearls. Most varieties need at least half to a full day of sun, but in really hot areas they will need some shade in the afternoon.

They love dry conditions and retain water in their leaves, so you don't have to water them too often. But, when you do, make sure the soil has good drainage so the roots don't rot. Place some pebbles over the soil, which helps with drainage and looks great as well.

A punnet of rocks being used to fill a plant pot around a succulent

3Edible plants

You can even grow a vertical vegie garden with edible plants like lettuce, rocket, spinach, strawberries, radishes, spring onions and herbs. In fact, you can pretty much grow most small-growing vegies and herbs in containers. It adds plenty of colour and fragrance to your garden while also providing you with fresh healthy ingredients for cooking.

Choose edible plants that are suited to your conditions. If the garden isn't going to get much sun, then leafy greens are a good choice but most other vegetables will need plenty of sun.

You can completely transform the look and feel of your outdoors with a vertical garden. It's great way to add a touch of nature and bring any outdoor space to life.

Herbs in a vertical garden being trimmed into a ceramic bowl with garden shears

4Start planting

Take a look at our range of plants and vertical gardens and get yours today!

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.