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A row of young hedge plants that will grow into shape

Overview

Hedges provide structure to your garden, effectively dividing it up into sections. Before you plant a hedge, make sure you know what kind you want – slow growing, tall or flowering. Generally, the taller you want your hedge to grow, the further you need to space your planting apart. In this step-by-step guide you'll learn how to plant a Murraya hedge for your garden.  

Steps

1Dig your holes for planting the hedge

First you need to dig the holes for planting your hedge trees. Make sure each hole is about 35cm deep. The closer you plant each tree, the faster the hedge will form so take that into consideration. 

A hole being dug for a hedge plant

2Add compost and plant your hedge

Place a handful of compost into each hole. Then carefully take your hedge out of the pot, give the roots a tease and place the plant in the middle of the hole. Backfill the hole with soil and compress the dirt around the plant to get rid of any air bubbles. Repeat the process with all of the plants to create your hedge row.

A hedge plant being put into place in a garden bed

3Water your hedge with seaweed solution

To finish your hedge, all you need to do is apply a seaweed solution. Add a cap full of seaweed concentrate to 9 litres of water in your watering can.

Liberally apply to your plants to give them a good head start. After a couple of months, give your hedge its first trim!

A hedge plant being watered

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.