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A pot plant holder with six pots hanging on a paling fence

Overview

A fence planter is an easy way to breathe new life into an old fence and make the most of the space in your backyard.

Steps

1Have the timber pre-cut

To make this D.I.Y. job even easier, once you've worked out how long you want your fence planters to be, you can have the wood pre-cut at selected Bunnings stores. Check your fence and make some measurements. We cut our 150mm x 25mm treated pine into two 880mm lengths.

Selection of tools required for this project

2Measure and mark for the holes

For the first planter tier, measure out your piece of timber and mark where the three pot plants will sit in the timber. Make sure they're evenly spaced. According to our plans, we measured 190mm in from either end of of the timber. Draw a straight line between your marks, making sure this is in the middle of your timber. Then evenly space out some marks for your pots on the line and draw the holes, which in our case were 250mm in diameter.

A person marking a length of timber using a measuring tape and pencil

3Make the holes for your pots

Pre-drill three pilot holes in each piece of timber. Then use a hole saw to cut out the holes, which in our case was 120mm. If you don't have a hole saw you can use a jigsaw to cut them out but make sure you draw around your pots to get the size of the hole right. For more planter tiers, simply repeat Steps 2 and 3. We made two tiers.

A person cutting a large hole in a pine board using a hole saw attachment on a drill

4Measure and mark for the support ropes

Measure the width of the timber and mark the middle spot at each end of your timber, leaving some space at each end, which in our case was 30mm.

A person marking a length of timber using a measuring tape and pencil

5Drill the holes for the support ropes

Place the timber with the markings on, on top of the other piece. Clamp them to the workbench so that they're flush. Drill holes at each end that are large enough for the support rope to pass through.

A person drilling a hole into the end of a pine board

6Drill holes for the securing screws

Drill a hole in the ends of the timber that intersects with the hole for the supporting ropes. This is where the screws will be inserted to hold the ropes in place. For any other planter tiers, repeat Steps 4 to 6.

A person drilling a hole into the end of a pine board

7Thread the support ropes

To make it easier to thread the rope through the holes, tape it near the end and then cut it. This will stop it fraying. Thread the rope through both the top and bottom planter. Repeat this at the other end of the planter.

A person threading rope through a hole in a pine board

8Work out the lengths of the support ropes

The distance between your top and bottom planter tiers will depend on the height of the plants you want to sit in the bottom planter. We left 350mm between planter tiers and 350mm from the top planter tier to the top of the fence. Make sure you pull enough rope through the top planter to be able to secure the planter to the fence at the height you want. Tie a loop at the end of the rope to make it easier to hang the fence planter.

A person tying a knot in a piece of rope

9Secure the support ropes with screws

Get someone to help you with this step. While someone holds the top planter, use a square to measure the correct height and that the planters are square. Use the drill and screws to secure the rope through the pre-drilled hole in the side. Repeat this to secure the other three support ropes. Tie a knot in the ropes below the bottom planter. Cut the ropes so they're the same length.

A person screwing into rope through the end of a pine board

10Hang the wall planter

Secure two roofing screws to your fence, the same distance that the support ropes are apart, which in our case was 350mm. Hang the support ropes off the screws. Now it's time to add the colourful pot plants to your fence planter, then sit back, relax and enjoy.

A pot plant holder with six pots hanging on a paling fence

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.