Bunnings
Icon - Website - Mobile - Add to project list.svgIcon - Website - Mobile - Cart.svg

Sign in to your account

Project list

Sign in to your account

A round chalkboard table with chalk and children's drawings

Overview

Kids love to draw with chalk and this chalkboard table is perfect for the budding little artist. It will make a great addition to any kid’s bedroom and it’s a really easy project to make.

Steps

1Cut your timber

Before you start this project, you can have your timber pre-cut at Bunnings. We had our ply panel cut to a manageable size so we could make our 600mm x 600mm markings. The dowel for the four table legs were cut to 600mm each.

A sheet of thick plywood and four lengths of dowel

2Mark out a 600mm square and find the centre

On your piece of plywood, measure out and mark a 600mm square. Use the spirit level to draw two diagonal lines from corner to corner and mark where these lines intersect.
A person marking measurements on a sheet of plywood

3Drill a hole for the router

Use a 3mm drill bit to pre-drill a hole in the centre of the table, which will act as a guide for the router.
A person drilling a hole through the centre of a panel of plywood

4Cut out the table

Clamp the plywood to the workbench with some wood underneath to stop the bench from getting cut. Set your router to cut a large circle with a radius of 300mm. Then with your safety gear on, secure the point of the router arm and start cutting the circle.

A person cutting a circle in plywood using a router

5Measure and mark for the legs

Using the lines marked on the plywood, measure 200mm from the centre along each of the four lines. Mark these spots where the table legs will go.

A person marking a measurement on a round sheet of plywood

6Drill the holes for the legs

Clamp the plywood to the workbench. Using a 3mm drill bit, pre-drill the four holes for the legs where you've marked.

A person drilling a hole in a round sheet of plywood using a cordless drill

7Find the centre of the dowel legs

Use the tape measure to find the centre at the top of the dowel legs. Mark the spot on all four legs.

A person marking the centre of a piece of dowel

8Drill holes in the dowel

Clamp the dowel to the workbench and drill holes in the centre of the dowel with a 3mm drill bit.

A person drilling a hole in a piece of dowel using a cordless drill

9Attach the legs to the table

Clamp the table to the workbench. Apply PVA wood glue to the top of the dowel. Use 75mm bugle screws and the hex bit to fix each leg to the table.

A person inserting a screw through a round table top into a table leg

10Putty the holes

Putty up the holes with wood filler. Let it dry and then sand with 180 grit sandpaper. Also lightly sand around the edges of the tabletop to remove any splinters.

A person filling a hole in a round sheet of plywood using wood filler

11Sand the legs

Use the 120 grit sandpaper to sand the legs until they're smooth, which will give you a great finish.

A person sanding a dowel leg on a round table

12Paint the table

To complete your table, use a roller to paint the top of the table with chalkboard paint. We also painted the top part of the legs to match. When you're painting, make sure you follow the manufacturer's instructions and work in a well ventilated area with your safety gear on.

A person painting a round table with blackboard paint using a roller

13Time to play!

Now your chalkboard table is finished, your kids can get creative! All you have to do is wipe it over occasionally and it will last for ages.

A round chalkboard table with chalk and children's drawings

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.