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A person manually opening a garage roller door

Overview

An automatic garage door can not only make life easier, it's also a safer and more secure way to park and store your car. Installing your own remote control garage door opener is easier than you might think.

Steps

1Check the roller door operates smoothly

Before you begin installing a remote garage door opener, raise and lower the door to make sure it is correctly balanced and rolls freely. Remove any locks or ropes that might hinder it. Also, lift the door to about halfway and release it. The door should remain perfectly balanced. If there are problems, call a roller door technician to get it repaired before installing the opener.

A person manually closing a garage roller door

2Install the stop collar

You need to install the stop collar on the opposite end to the motor. Fit the stop collar hard against the boss of the door drum. Make sure the U-bolt holding the door shaft is tightly fastened. If it isn't, the spring tension won't work and the door won't function.

A person fitting a stop collar against the boss of a roller door drum using a screwdriver

3Install the weight bar

The weight bar needs to be installed in the centre at the bottom of the door. If your door doesn't have a handle, drill two 5.5mm holes through the two marked positions and place the weight bar on the inside of the door. Use the bolts, washers, and nuts to fasten the weight bar in place. If your door has a lifting handle, remove it and install the weight bar in this spot.

A weight bar being clamped to the inside bottom edge of a roller door

4Attach the release handle and cord

Thread one end of the rope through the hole in the top of the red release handle. Secure with an overhead knot at least 25mm from the end of the rope, this will prevent slipping. Thread the other end of the rope through the loop of the manual release cable. Adjust the length so the handle is no higher than 1.8m above the floor. Secure with an overhead knot.

A person attach a release handle and cord to a roller door motor

5Disengage the opener

Disengage the opener by pulling on the release cable. You will know the motor is disengaged when you hear an audible click. The release cable allows you to open and close the door manually if there's a blackout or you've lost the remote. 

A person pulling the release cable on a roller door motor

6Mark where you want to secure the door

To make sure the roller door is secure before you install the motor, pin it to the drum with screws. It's important to do this so that your door doesn't balloon, which may delay the safety reversal response and compromise security. To do this, close the roller door and mark the last part of the curtain where it meets the drum. This is where the screws should go.

A person holding a marker pen against a closed roller door

7Secure the screws

Roll up the door until the mark is visible. Then lift the door about half a turn from the closed position to give you enough room to drill. Secure the screws through the door curtain and into the drum wheel at the end of each roll. Now the door is pinned, you can install the motor.

A person putting a screw into a roller door using a cordless drill

8Preparing to remove the bracket

The motor can be installed on either the right- or left-hand side of the door, but it needs to be opposite the stop collar. Place the opener in manual release mode, and open the door fully. Make sure the U-bolt on the other side is tight. Before removing a heavy roller door from its bracket, get a friend to help by supporting the door. You'll also need a ladder and a ratchet tie-down strap or rope for extra support. Once the door is supported, mark the position of the door shaft on the right hand door bracket.

A person undoing a U-bolt securing a roller door using a socket wrench

9Remove the brackets

Once the roller door is supported you can remove the right hand axle U-bolt and mounting bracket from the wall.

A person undoing a U-bolt securing a roller door using a socket wrench and cordless drill

10Install the motor

Install the motor by sliding the opener over the axle and then engage the drive legs into the door drum wheel either side of the spoke.

A person fitting a motor onto the axle of a roller door

11Refit the bracket

Refit the door mounting bracket to the wall. Clamp the opener to the axle and bracket using the clamp that's supplied. Then you can remove all the ropes and the support ladder.

Two people repositioning a roller door after fitting a motor

12Check the operation of the roller door

Check the operation of the roller door by disengaging the motor and manually rolling the door up and down. 

A person manually opening a garage roller door

13Program the door opener

Make sure the door is halfway and the opener is engaged. Plug the opener into the power supply, the LED lights should come on. Now it's time to program the opener. You can program it for left and right operation, door travel limits and force limits. To program your garage opener, refer to the instruction manual included in your roller door pack.

A person using a remote control to open a garage roller door

14Check the safety reverse system

To check the safety reverse system is working, place a block of wood or another object under the roller door. Close the door. You will know it works if the roller door touches the object and automatically reverses.

A person manually closing a garage roller door

15Affix the warning stickers

Attach the warning labels to the garage wall.

A person applying a safety warning sticker to a wall

16Installation complete

Now your remote control door opener is ready to go, you'll never need to leave the comfort of your car again.
A person applying a safety warning sticker to a wall

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Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.