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Person hitting a plastic peg with a hammer to secure garden edging.

Overview

This guide shows you how to install garden edging around a tree. It's an easy DIY project that will keep grass away from the tree and help it to grow.

Tools and materials

Steps

1Remove the concrete ring from around the tree

Remove the concrete tree ring from around the tree by putting the shovel under it and levering it up. Ask someone to help you lift the ring over the tree. If the tree is too tall to lift the concrete ring over, use a sledge hammer to break it into smaller pieces.

Person digging a perimeter around a tree.

2Dig around the tree

Use the shovel to create a border by digging up the grass surrounding the tree. How far you dig up the grass away from the tree will determine the length of edging you'll need. Dig a trench for the plastic garden edging to sit in. 
Person digging around a tree.

3Roll-out and cut the garden edging

Take the roll of garden edging and lay it in the trench you dug around the tree. Let the edging overlap where it meets by about 10 centimetres. This is where the edging will be joined. Mark where the end of the overlap is and use a hacksaw to cut the edging.
Person laying plastic garden edging around a tree.

4Secure the edging

Place a peg on the inside of the garden edging, where it overlaps. Use a hammer to drive the plastic peg into the ground. Make sure that the top of the peg's overhanging lip is sitting on the garden edging. Continue hammering in the pegs, so that they're evenly spaced around the garden edging and it is secure.

Person hitting a plastic peg with a hammer to secure garden edging.

5Backfill and add mulch to the tree

After hammering in the pegs, use the shovel to backfill the soil into the trench the garden edging is sitting in. Do this on the inside and outside of the edging. This will allow the grass to grow right up to, but not over the edging. Add a healthy layer of mulch around the tree, this will not only help the tree to grow but will also make the project look more professional.

Person using shovel to fill up a hole with dirt.

Suggested products

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.