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Person using flexible plastic blade to remove silicone sealant in between tiled wall and toilet.

Overview

You can freshen up your whole bathroom just by removing silicone that's discoloured, stained or untidy. We show you how to cut and scrape out the old silicone. Plus, how to take off any residue so the surface is clean and ready for resealing.

Steps

1Cut along where the silicone joins the wall

Use a sharp knife and cut along the silicone, running the metal blade along the wall. Then gently run a flat-blade chisel against the tiles so the silicone pops out.
Person using box cutter knife to loosen silicone sealant between tiled wall and toilet.

2Scrape inside the gap

Use a flexible plastic or metal blade to scrape out the deeper remaining silicone. Push and pull the blade backwards and forwards between the gap. The silicone will grip the surface of the blade and start to come loose. 
Person using flexible plastic blade to remove silicone sealant in between tiled wall and toilet.

3Wipe the surfaces clean

Once you have removed most of the silicone, wipe the remnants off using a cloth. You can make the job a bit eaiser by soaking the cloth in methylated spirits. The methylated spirits act as a solvent, breaking down the last of the silicone, making it less sticky and easier to wipe up.

Person wearing gloves pouring methylated spirits into cloth.

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More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.