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An outdoor area with timber pavers laid into white gravel amid potted plants

Overview

Natural timber looks great anywhere. These timber pavers will make an attractive addition to any garden. And the beauty is that you can make them any size you like to create the look you want.

Steps

1Measure and cut the timber

The beauty of this project is that you can make the pavers any size you like. The first paver we made was 400mm long. We measured, marked and cut two pieces of timber to this length. Measure and mark out as many pavers as you need, then cut them to size using a drop saw or hand saw. Remember, each paver is made of two pieces of timber that are the same length.

A person cutting a timber sleeper with a drop saw

2Join the timber together

Clamp the two pieces of wood together. Use the 16mm spade bit to countersink a hole, drill the hole on an angle, so it drills into the other piece of timber. Drill a pilot hole with the 5mm bit. Fix the two pieces of timber together with a 100mm batten screw. Repeat the process for the opposite diagonal on the opposite side of the timber. Repeat this step to join all of your pavers.

A person drilling a hole in  the end of a piece of timber

3Lay the pavers

Place the paver where you want it in your garden. Use a shovel to mark around the paver. Remove the paver, dig the hole to the depth of your paver. Put the paver in place and backfill around it. Repeat this process to lay the other pavers.

A person holding a shovel standing next to a timber paver laid into white gravel

4Great looking path

And there you have it, a great looking pathway. You can stain the timber or leave it natural. Either way you'll have a fantastic path in your garden for years to come.

An outdoor area with timber pavers laid into white gravel amid potted plants

More D.I.Y. Advice

Health & Safety

Please make sure you use all equipment appropriately and safely when following the advice in these D.I.Y. videos. You need to be familiar with how to use equipment safely and follow the instructions that came with the equipment. If you are unsure, you may feel it is safest to consult an expert, such as the manufacturer or an expert Bunnings Team Member.

Grave health hazards are linked to asbestos, which may be in homes built up to 1990. Health hazards may result from exposure to lead-based paints in older materials and copper chromium arsenic (CCA) treated timber. For information on the dangers of asbestos, lead-based paint and CCA treated timber and tips for dealing with these materials contact your local council's Environmental Health Officer. You can also use a simple test kit from Bunnings to indicate the presence of lead-based paint.