7 easy festive wreath ideas

Start the Christmas styling with a DIY wreath, or several, to adorn your door and walls.

Bunnings magazine, Summer 2020

Beautiful Christmas additions

Making your own wreath lets you design it just the way you want it. It’s also easier than you might think – some of these ones need nothing more than wire and a sprig of garden greenery.

Safety tip:

When working with wire, cut it on a flat, clear surface. Make sure your pliers are sharp and use gloves and protective eye-wear to prevent pieces flicking up and causing injury.

Foliage wreath

Tools and materials

30cm pot trivet

Clear cable ties

Large bunch of foliage such as Eriostemon 

Mini pliers


Create the ring

1. Remove the two inside rings of a 30cm-diameter metal pot trivet, using bolt cutters to snip the joining pieces around the inside, keeping the outer rings joined.

Secure the foliage

2. Working around the ring in one direction, position foliage sprigs, securing the stems with cable ties, trimming the excess ties with pliers.
Tip: Completely cover the ring, positioning sprigs so the foliage hides the stems and ties.

A wreath of garden cuttings

Wire star

Tools and materials

1.6mm PVC coated tie wire

Clear cable ties

Mini pliers

Natural jute twine

Two sprigs of gum leaves (or similar from the garden)


Make the star

1. Cut an 800mm length of tie wire, bending it into a five-pointed star shape. Twist the ends together and position the join at the base.

Add gum leaves

2. Cover the join with a gum leaf sprig along either side of the point, secure with cable ties, trimming the excess with pliers. Hang from a wall hook or door handle with a double-length of jute twine.

A star shaped wreath with fauna woven at bottom

Baby's breath wreath

Tools and materials

Bunch of baby’s breath flowers

Clear cable ties

Mini bolt cutters

Mini pliers

Veggie cage


Dismantle the cage

1. Remove the frame from a veggie cage, using bolt cutters to trim as close to the wire rings as possible.
Tip: Keep the remaining rings to make other wreaths.

Attach flowers

2. Position sprigs of baby’s breath around two-thirds of the ring, securing stems with cable ties, trimming the excess with pliers.
Tip: If hanging your wreath on a wall, use fasteners to suit the wall type – usually plasterboard or masonry.

A circular wreath with white flowers attached to bottom half

Rope wreath

Tools and materials

30cm pot trivet

20m x 6mm twisted rope

Masking tape

Scissors


Start weaving

2. Cut coils of rope into equal thirds with scissors. Tape the end of a length to the back of the frame, weave the rope around and over the outside of the frame, then under and over the inside of the frame, repeating to complete the length.

Joining sections of rope

3. Tape the end of the rope to the back of the frame, tape the beginning of a new length over it and repeat weaving, positioning the rope over the ends to hold them in place. Repeat with the remaining lengths.When the frame is covered, leave 50mm at the end to tuck into the weaving at the back.

A rattan looking woven circular wreath

Olive wreath

Tools and materials

Bunch of olive branches 

Clear cable ties

Mini bolt cutters

Mini pliers

Veggie cage


Make the frame

1. Remove the frame from a veggie cage, using bolt cutters to trim as close to the wire rings as possible.
Tip: Keep the remaining rings to make other wreaths.

Attach the greenery

2. Position small olive branches around three-quarters of the ring and secure the stems with cable ties. Trim the excess length of the ties with pliers.

Olive leaves form a minimalist exposed wreath

Branch Wreath

Tools and materials

0.7mm galvanised tie wire

Dried twig branches 

Mini pliers

Shape the circle

1. Use pliers to cut four 100mm lengths of tie wire. Twist a handful of dried twig branches into a circular shape, bending and weaving them together.

Secure the twigs

2. Secure each quarter with wire, wrapping it around the twigs firmly and bending the ends inwards.

Twigs encircled and tied into a wreath

Draping wreath

Tools and materials

4mm thick wire rope

Bunch of olive branches

Bunch of Pieris japonica

Clear cable ties

Clear fishing line

Mini bolt cutters

Mini pliers

Trim the wire rope

1. Cut a 500mm length of wire rope with bolt cutters. Arrange a handful of foliage sprigs so the stems are offset.

Add the foliage

2. Working on a flat surface, position the arranged sprigs along the wire, from one end, securing the stems with cable ties. Trim the excess ties with pliers.
Repeat with more arranged sprigs along the wire, covering the full length.

Hang with fishing wire

3.Tie fishing line onto either end of the wreath's wire to hang it from the top, allowing the middle to drape.
Tip: Keep natural foliage fresh by hanging away from direct sunlight and spritzing regularly with water.

A bow of native leaves and flora

Looking for more crafty Christmas ideas?

Have a go at our festive DIY projects.

Photo Credit: Cath Muscat
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